Category Archives: Engineering

PWS Coordinates Frequencies For Soccer Tournament

PWS provided overall frequency coordination services for the 2017 CONCACAF Gold Cup.

Professional Wireless Systems (PWS) provided frequency coordination for the multi-city 2017 CONCACAF Gold Cup soccer cup in July, the company announced today.

Fourteen venues in 13 cities hosted various stages of the tournament. PWS began preparing its frequency coordination efforts about a month before the event via a website. All vendors involved used the site to identify the frequencies they planned to use.

This list of frequency usage was shared and coordinated with local SBE coordinators. All SBE-approved frequencies were submitted to the FCC for final confirmation, PWS said in a press release.

“Coordinating a single location was fairly easy, but coordinating all of the cities and parties wanting to use the spectrum was the biggest challenge for us on this project,” says Kasey Gchachu, PWS project manager.

More information is available on the PWS website.

Ben Hawker Joins Presteigne Broadcast

Presteigne Broadcast Hire has appointed Ben Hawker as senior supervisor of RF and special cameras.

Before joining the company, Hawker was a senior RF engineer at Broadcast RF where he worked on international news and sporting events, such as the London Summer Olympics and the Royal wedding.

More information is available at the Presteigne website.

SET Expo Organizers Seek Papers

The clock is ticking down to the July 31 deadline for submission of scientific papers for the 2017 SET (the Brazilian Society of Television Engineering) Expo Conferences in São Paulo on Aug. 21-24.

Articles will be published in the SET International Journal of Broadcast Engineering (SET IJBE). Authors will receive an invitation to present their work during the event.

Topics for the call include: new platforms and infrastructure; content production; regulatory and normative; management and workflow; technology for TV and radio (traditional broadcast); innovation and disruptive technologies; technology and business.

Authors must submit their articles in English. Rules are available online.

Hearst TV Promotes Stefan Hadl

Stefan Hadl.

Hearst Television has promoted Stefan Hadl to director of engineering, eastern region.

Hadl, who was working as director of engineering and operations at the station group’s WCVB in Boston, succeeds Mike Keller, who will retire at the end of the year.

Hadl will be based at WCVB and report to Hearst Television VP engineering Marty Faubell.

In a press release announcing the promotion, Faubell called Hadl “an exceptional leader” and said he was “instrumental in our company’s role in the successful digital TV transition….”

No successor has yet been named to the WCVB position Hadl vacated.

Hadl joined Hearst Television in 1995 as a broadcast engineer at what later became the company’s KCRA-KQCA Sacramento, Calif., duopoly.

 

SET Expo Organizers Issue Call For Speakers

If Brazil is in your travel plans this summer and you are a broadcast engineer, researcher, academician other member of this industry’s tech intelligentsia, why not submit your name as a possible speaker at the 2017 SET Expo Conference, Aug. 21-24, in São Paulo?

Event organizers have issued a call for speakers. They are specifically interested in those with something to say on: new platforms and infrastructure; content production; regulatory and normative issues; management and workflow; technology for TV and radio; innovative and disruptive technologies; and technology and business issues for the media, entertainment and technology industry.

The rules and forms for submitting a proposal to speak are available here.

Professionals, researchers, students and professors of engineering and technology in fields related to the desired discussion topics are invited to submit.

The deadline to submit a proposal is June 30.

George Wicker, Brett Benson Join Utah Scientific

George Wicker.

George Wicker and Brett Benson have been appointed as regional sales managers in the U.S. Southeast by Utah Scientific, the company announced.

The pair will work together on all direct sales activities and partner relationships throughout the eight-state region, which includes Tennessee, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Alabama, Mississippi, Georgia and Florida. Both report directly to Tom Harmon, company president and CEO.

Wicker is returning to Utah Scientific, having previously worked as the company’s Southeast regional sales manager throughout the 1990s.

Brett Benson.

Benson has worked in the broadcast industry for more than 20 years — from Southeast regional sales manager for Weather Central in Madison, Wis., to GM and chief engineer for Park City Television.

More information is available on the company’s website.

James Ruedlinger Rejoins ERI

James Ruedlinger has rejoined Electronics Research Inc. as SVP, engineering, the company announced yesterday. He will be responsible for managing ERI’s RF and Structural Engineering Groups.

A registered professional engineer, Ruedlinger spent about 15 years with ERI from 2000 through 2014. For the past two years he has worked for Crown Castle as an engineering manager.

“The timing is perfect for James’ return to ERI and he will strengthen the company’s already expanded manufacturing and engineering capacity ahead of the FCC repack of the television broadcast band,” said Kenny Brown, ERI COO.

More information is available on the ERI website.

Imagine eBook Tackles Broadcast Engineering-IT Mashup

Thousands of written words, countless conversations and a seemingly endless stream of conference sessions have been devoted to tackling the topic of amalgamating broadcast engineering and information technology and the cultural ramifications of doing so on operations and workflow.

Now, Imagine Communications is tackling the topic with a new eBook: The Future of Broadcast Engineering — Dealing with the Cultural Impact of the Fusion of Broadcast and IT.

Topics covered include:

  • Understanding the scope of the cultural impact on operations when transitioning to next-generation technologies.
  • Evolving job descriptions of broadcast engineers and other media pros.
  • Possible training and education requirements broadcast engineers will need for the future.
  • The top five best practices broadcast engineers can follow to transition their skills for what’s needed in IP-based production facilities.

Downloading the eBook requires registration online.

WRAL Manages Resources With MediaPulse

WRAL, the Capitol Broadcasting-owned NBC affiliate in Raleigh-Durham, N.C., has begun using the Xytech MediaPulse software to manage its production and news activities, the company announced this week.

MediaPulse is making it easier for the station to schedule reporters, photographers, anchors, engineers and creative services personnel, the company said. The station is also using the platform to manage the use of equipment and trucks as well as support master control scheduling.

More information is available on the Xytech website.

 

Broadcast RF Delivers For Woody Harrelson’s Live Movie

Broadcast RF played a key role last week in Woody Harrelson’s Lost in London one-camera, one-take production beamed to more than 500 U.S. movie theaters and one in London.

Actor, director Woody Harrelson’s ambitious live production, Lost in London, beamed to more than 500 U.S. theaters and one in London last week, required an expensive RF deployment put in place by Broadcast RF.

The company, which this week issued a press release on the project, deployed a Domo HD transmitter in a backpack with four batteries and sound equipment.

Carried by a grip, the backpack was connected via an umbilical cable to an Arri Alexa Mini shooting at 1080.23.98PsF.

Broadcast RF set up receive sites at 14 locations throughout central London. A total of 54 antennas were used. According to the company, the production was the “largest single RF camera job Broadcast RF has ever done,” and that includes events such as Wimbledon and the Ryder Cup combined.

The 100-minute-long Lost in London production was shot with a single camera in a single take.

Readers might also find The Guardian online story, “Lost in London Review: Woody Harrelson’s Live Movie Is A Miraculous Oddity,” quite interesting.