'Paternity Court' Clearances Hit 92%

The upcoming half-hour syndicated entry from MGM Television's Orion TV Productions will air in all top 50 markets. It's hosted by Lauren Lake and being sold on an all-barter basis in mostly one-year deals.
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Lawyer and TV personality Lauren Lake will be wearing a judge’s robe on Paternity Court when it premieres on Sept. 23. Orion TV Productions has sold the show to stations owned by CBS, Tribune, Sinclair, Hearst and others reaching 92% of TV homes, including in all top-50 DMAs.

But Lake will also tap into her experience as a relationship expert on talk shows such as CBS Television Distribution’s Dr. Phil and NBCUniversal’s Maury.

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“We want to dig into these stories much deeper than any other court show does,” says David Armour, executive producer of Paternity Court. “We’re dealing with substantial issues. On this show, we’re dealing with resolutions about how families can move forward now that they have [paternity test] results.”

On most episodes of the half-hour show, there will be one case, as opposed to two on other court shows. Lake will take time before and after each episode’s test results to speak with her guests.

“Steve Harvey has reinvigorated game shows and talk shows,” says John Bryan, president of domestic television distribution at MGM Television. “We’re hoping to do the same thing with court. The show is a fresh idea in a proven genre.”

Still, the set has a familiar court show feel. Two guests stand at podiums with a studio audience behind them. Lake oversees the case from her desk.

Brand Connections

Paternity Court is taping at the Sunset Bronson studios in Hollywood on a set right next door to CBS Television Distribution’s Judge Judy. It is produced by 79th & York Entertainment and is distributed by MGM Television’s Orion TV Productions.

Orion TV Productions is selling Paternity Court on an all-barter basis in mostly one-year deals. The show will air on many stations as back-to-back half-hours, including on CBS Television Stations’ WLNY New York, Ellis Communications’ KDOC Los Angeles and Weigel Broadcasting’s WCUU Chicago.

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Ratings

Overnights, adults 18-49 for May 4, 2016
  • 1.
    2.4/8
  • 2.
    1.7/6
  • 3.
    1.5/5
  • 4.
    1.0/4
  • 5.
    0.7/2
  • 6.
    0.6/2
Source: Nielsen

Reviews

  • Dominic Patten

    There are a lot of good things to say about the near-perfect The Night Manager. But it’s best to cut to the core and say that the Susanne Bier-directed miniseries is simply great television. Now, co-production already played in the UK earlier this year where it was a ratings hit and cultural phenomenon. No doubts as to why. The six-part series airing in the U.S. on AMC starring Hugh Laurie, Tom Hiddleston, Olivia Colman and Elizabeth Debicki is worthy of all of the accolades and adjectives with which one can praise a show – and this in an era of TV excellence. The actors are all consistently at their very best here, with Oscar winner Bier never better behind the camera. Watch Night Manager week by week or in one DVR’d binge, but don’t miss the excellence that is this adaptation of John le Carré’s 1993 novel — you will be the lesser for it if you do.

  • Mark Dawidziak

    From the first frame, it's clear that Jackie Robinson is a genuine labor of love. The warmly crafted two-part, four-hour PBS documentary from filmmaker Ken Burns positively glows with its admiration for the man and his accomplishments. Unabashedly positive in its overall approach? Yes, and Burns is somewhat old-fashioned in that regard. He believes that admiration is a good and legitimate reason to compose a biography of someone. He's not going to apologize for that. That doesn't mean you ignore the flaws and frailties. But Burns, like historian David McCullough, maintains that biographies can celebrate worthy American lives, not merely tear them down.

  • Robert Bianco

    NBC is clearly betting a show that’s merely pleasant can survive in a crowded TV universe. And who knows, with Crowded, NBC could be right. Certainly pleasant is in short supply these days. Admittedly, “undemanding” is not exactly a strong endorsement, and NBC is unlikely to build an ad campaign around the show freeing you from weekly commitment pressure. But it’s something. And here’s something else, and something better, Crowded has to offer: Patrick Warburton and Carrie Preston, two of TV's most skilled and appealing actors. Put them together, and you have the strongest inducement to make room for their sitcom. Two may not count as a crowd, but these two just may be enough for Crowded.

  • Mark Perigard

    WGN America’s new drama Underground might be about the Underground Railroad, but its makers, including executive producer John Legend, aren’t content to coast on a bit of riveting 19th century history. They’ve crafted a caper show with fascinating characters. This is Prison Break on a Georgia plantation, with a dollop of Scandal-size surprises. Underground looks to be the most addictive new show of spring.

  • Jeff Jensen

    He huffs, he puffs, he snorts yards of blow up his nose. He’s Richie Finestra, flailing founder of an imploding record company, American Century, and he’s exactly what TV doesn’t need right now — one more anguished, toxic, middle-aged male anti-hero raging against the dying light of his powers. Played by Bobby Cannavale with a ferociousness that sucks you in even as it wears you down, Richie is the black hole center of HBO's Vinyl, a drama set in ‘70s New York at the dawn of punk and hip-hop, produced by the super-group of Martin Scorsese, Terence Winter (Boardwalk Empire), Rich Cohen and Mick Jagger. It’s a sometimes thrilling period piece dulled by new century Bleak TV blah blah blah.

  • Mark Perigard

    With thanks to "sweet baby Jesus" for allowing her to premiere during a "deranged" election season, veteran Daily Show correspondent Samantha Bee launched her own comedy news show Full Frontal with Samantha Bee on TBS. In the closing segment, she sent a “foreign exchange producer” to gauge the level of support for Jeb Bush, who can’t get voters to clap for him. When asked what kind of drink Jeb would be, one supporter said milk — “a normal drink.” “He’s a little meek,” another supporter said. Not Bee. If there’s one complaint: Once a week is just not enough for Samantha Bee. Do something about that, will you, TBS?

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