'Paternity Court' Clearances Hit 92%

The upcoming half-hour syndicated entry from MGM Television's Orion TV Productions will air in all top 50 markets. It's hosted by Lauren Lake and being sold on an all-barter basis in mostly one-year deals.
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Lawyer and TV personality Lauren Lake will be wearing a judge’s robe on Paternity Court when it premieres on Sept. 23. Orion TV Productions has sold the show to stations owned by CBS, Tribune, Sinclair, Hearst and others reaching 92% of TV homes, including in all top-50 DMAs.

But Lake will also tap into her experience as a relationship expert on talk shows such as CBS Television Distribution’s Dr. Phil and NBCUniversal’s Maury.

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“We want to dig into these stories much deeper than any other court show does,” says David Armour, executive producer of Paternity Court. “We’re dealing with substantial issues. On this show, we’re dealing with resolutions about how families can move forward now that they have [paternity test] results.”

On most episodes of the half-hour show, there will be one case, as opposed to two on other court shows. Lake will take time before and after each episode’s test results to speak with her guests.

“Steve Harvey has reinvigorated game shows and talk shows,” says John Bryan, president of domestic television distribution at MGM Television. “We’re hoping to do the same thing with court. The show is a fresh idea in a proven genre.”

Still, the set has a familiar court show feel. Two guests stand at podiums with a studio audience behind them. Lake oversees the case from her desk.

Brand Connections

Paternity Court is taping at the Sunset Bronson studios in Hollywood on a set right next door to CBS Television Distribution’s Judge Judy. It is produced by 79th & York Entertainment and is distributed by MGM Television’s Orion TV Productions.

Orion TV Productions is selling Paternity Court on an all-barter basis in mostly one-year deals. The show will air on many stations as back-to-back half-hours, including on CBS Television Stations’ WLNY New York, Ellis Communications’ KDOC Los Angeles and Weigel Broadcasting’s WCUU Chicago.

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Ratings

Overnights, adults 18-49 for August 31, 2015
  • 1.
    1.8/6
  • 2.
    1.1/3
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    1.1/4
  • 4.
    1.0/3
  • 5.
    0.5/2
  • 6.
    0.3/1
Source: Nielsen

Reviews

  • Mark Perigard

    In the dog days of August, just a few weeks before the fall season begins, NBC sneaks in an un­heralded sitcom. You, the savvy viewer, are expecting the primetime equivalent of a turkey surprise. But The Carmichael Show on NBC is something different, a show about an African-­American family that manages to draw on and update the bite of All in the Family and the silli­ness of its spinoff, The Jeffersons.

  • Mike Hale

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  • Mark Perigard

    Maybe Craig Robinson owes money to the head of NBC programming. Or maybe Craig Robinson is being blackmailed by NBC for some nefarious reason. There must be a rational explanation for why he’d agree to star in Mr. Robinson, a dreary show that has all the edge of a doughnut hole and comes slathered with an astonishing amount of sexual innuendo for a network sitcom.

  • Hank Stuever

    Whether its star intends it this way or not, TV Land’s The Jim Gaffigan Show will correctly be perceived as a sunnier answer to the cloudy-day tendencies of FX’s Louie. Gaffigan’s world is much less artful, more straight-on and also culled from his real life. Gaffigan has perfected his shtick, mixing deep sarcasm and negativity with a fine-line inoffensiveness. It works as a stage presence, but not so much as a TV character.

  • David Wiegand

    Denis Leary’s new FX sitcom, Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll, would have been everything he hopes it could be if he’d made it 20 years ago. Maybe even earlier. S&D&R&R has several things going for it that make it passably enjoyable, including some funny dialogue, good performances and, of course, Leary’s trademark grumpy charm. But many viewers are right to expect something more and fresher from Leary.

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