Production Begins Today On 'Paternity Court'

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Paternity Court, a new courtroom series begins production today with legal and relationship expert Lauren Lake serving as the presiding judge. Nationally syndicated, the 30-minute first run show will premiere this fall in more than 91% of the country, airing five days a week.

Paternity Court is produced by 79th & York Entertainment and distributed by Orion TV Productions (Orion Television), a division of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Inc.

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Paternity Court will debut in all of the top 50 markets including: New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Philadelphia, Boston, Washington, Dallas, Atlanta, Phoenix, Orlando, Detroit and Seattle.  Station groups include: Tribune, CBS, Sinclair, Weigel, Hearst and others, encompassing more than 140 stations nationwide.

In making the announcement, John Bryan, president, domestic television distribution, MGM Television, said: “The issue of paternity has long resonated with audiences across the country and Paternity Court will tell the stories of emotionally life-changing issues beyond the parent/child relationship. Our hope is Lauren Lake’s verdict will inspire litigants to take responsibility for the outcome and provide resolution.”

Paternity Court judge Lauren Lake is a member of New York, New Jersey and Michigan State Bar Associations, and has appeared as a legal and relationship expert on Dr. Phil, Anderson, The Today Show, The View, Dr. Drew on Call,  MSNBC, Nancy Grace, CNN and HLN, among many others.

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Ratings

Overnights, adults 18-49 for May 21, 2015
  • 1.
    1.1/4
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    1.0/4
  • 3.
    0.9/3
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    0.8/3
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    0.8/3
  • 6.
    0.2/1
Source: Nielsen

Reviews

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