Production Begins Today On 'Paternity Court'

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Paternity Court, a new courtroom series begins production today with legal and relationship expert Lauren Lake serving as the presiding judge. Nationally syndicated, the 30-minute first run show will premiere this fall in more than 91% of the country, airing five days a week.

Paternity Court is produced by 79th & York Entertainment and distributed by Orion TV Productions (Orion Television), a division of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Inc.

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Paternity Court will debut in all of the top 50 markets including: New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Philadelphia, Boston, Washington, Dallas, Atlanta, Phoenix, Orlando, Detroit and Seattle.  Station groups include: Tribune, CBS, Sinclair, Weigel, Hearst and others, encompassing more than 140 stations nationwide.

In making the announcement, John Bryan, president, domestic television distribution, MGM Television, said: “The issue of paternity has long resonated with audiences across the country and Paternity Court will tell the stories of emotionally life-changing issues beyond the parent/child relationship. Our hope is Lauren Lake’s verdict will inspire litigants to take responsibility for the outcome and provide resolution.”

Paternity Court judge Lauren Lake is a member of New York, New Jersey and Michigan State Bar Associations, and has appeared as a legal and relationship expert on Dr. Phil, Anderson, The Today Show, The View, Dr. Drew on Call,  MSNBC, Nancy Grace, CNN and HLN, among many others.

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Ratings

Overnights, adults 18-49 for March 1, 2015
  • 1.
    1.8/5
  • 2.
    1.6/5
  • 3.
    1.2/4
  • 4.
    1.0/3
  • 5.
    1.0/3
  • 6.
    0.4/1
Source: Nielsen

Reviews

  • Mark Perigard

    ABC’s Secrets and Lies is the second network TV series adapted from an Australian hit to focus on violence against a child in a month. NBC’s The Slap is self-explanatory and rich in character. With a title such as Secrets and Lies, ABC’s newest limited series is going for something a bit more salacious, but anyone hoping for a Desperate Housewives vibe (ABC’s last big Sunday hit) will be disappointed. This story unfolds as if it were told by someone overdosing on Ambien.

  • Rob Owen

    It's hard to imagine Fox's funny, entertaining and pretty original Last Man on Earth becoming a hit, but the same could have at one time been said about The Lego Movie and the screen version of 21 Jump Street, so you never can tell. Writers Chris Miller and Phil Lord had a hand in all three, and it's fair to say if you liked their movies, you'll probably dig this new TV comedy, too. Creatively, there's no question Last Man on Earth is a winner, a unique comedy in a sea of sitcoms viewers have seen before. But being original is also risky.

  • Tom Conroy

    CBS’s new crime dramedy Battle Creek is yet another detective series featuring two mismatched partners who are destined to achieve a grudging respect. Battle Creek might be able to survive on the strengths of its two charismatic lead actors, but the perfunctory mystery in the premiere suggests that the lack of creativity will do them in. That lack is all the more surprising because the writers of the episode are Vince Gilligan, the creator of Breaking Bad, and David Shore, the creator of House, both of which were innovative series.

  • David Hinckley

    When they  talk about the great folk music troubadours and carriers of the 20th century, too often they mention Woody Guthrie and A.P. Carter and the Lomaxes, then leave out Lead Belly. Huddie Ledbetter, grandson of slaves, is described in Smithsonian Channel's new documentary Legend of Lead Belly as a "human jukebox," an artist who listened to all the music around him, absorbed it and distilled it into an enormous body of his own work.

  • Brian Lowry

    With Two and a Half Men signing off, CBS will try to fill the void by shrinking the formula to two admittedly very familiar men, named Felix and Oscar. Matthew Perry completes his potentially dubious post-Friends hat trick — having starred in comedies for NBC and ABC as well — with this reboot of The Odd Couple, a beloved series that still derives some kick from Neil Simon’s blueprint, but also feels especially dated in this day and age, what with Felix as the nonsexual spouse, essentially, to Oscar’s slovenly husband. Good casting provides some hope, but this still feels oh-so-20th century.

  • Alessandra Stanley

    AMC's Better Call Saul revolves around Saul Goodman (Bob Odenkirk), the shady lawyer of Walter White, the hero of Breaking Bad, and is set roughly six years before the two men meet. It’s common to dread a spinoff; some succeed, but plenty disappoint. There is absolutely no need to worry about this prequel to the Breaking Bad canon. Better Call Saul traces in loving, if corrosive, detail how Jimmy McGill, a debt-ridden, ambulance-chasing loser, changed his name to Saul Goodman and became a drug-lord consigliere. Better Call Saul is better than good: It’s delightful — in a brutal, darkly comic way, of course.

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