Dma 52 (Buffalo, NY)

Granite Names Michael Nurse WKBW GM

The long-time station manager/VP of sales is promoted to lead the Buffalo, N.Y., ABC affiliate following the retirement of Bill Ransom.
By
TVNewsCheck,

Granite Broadcasting Corp. today announced that it has promoted Michael Nurse to president and general manager of WKBW, its ABC affiliate in Buffalo, N.Y. (DMA 52).

The appointment is effective July 1. Nurse is succeeding Bill Ransom who recently announced his retirement.

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In his new role, Nurse will be responsible for overseeing the station’s operations, as well as its various programming and sales functions.  Nurse has served as WKBW station manager and VP of sales for the past 11 years.

Nurse is a broadcasting veteran with extensive management experience having served as general manager for television stations in Boston and Washington, D.C. Nurse began his career at WRKO-AM in Boston, and has previously worked at 24/7 Real Media, an Internet advertising and technology company, as the SVP of sales and marketing.

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Comments (3) -

Pat Pattison posted over 3 years ago
Congratulations Mike, couldn't happen to a nicer and more qualified guy.
Frank Jazzo posted over 3 years ago
Mike, congratulations on the promotion. Frank
teddy64 Nickname posted over 3 years ago
Well the previous management destroyed one of America's great TV stations..The prototype to Good Morning America was their morning show..Granite needs to sell!!
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Ratings

Overnights, adults 18-49 for August 22, 2016
  • 1.
    1.7/6
  • 2.
    1.2/5
  • 3.
    0.7/2
  • 4.
    0.7/3
  • 5.
    0.6/2
  • 6.
    0.3/1
Source: Nielsen

Reviews

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  • Neil Genzlinger

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