Dma 52 (Buffalo, NY)

Granite Names Michael Nurse WKBW GM

The long-time station manager/VP of sales is promoted to lead the Buffalo, N.Y., ABC affiliate following the retirement of Bill Ransom.

Granite Broadcasting Corp. today announced that it has promoted Michael Nurse to president and general manager of WKBW, its ABC affiliate in Buffalo, N.Y. (DMA 52).

The appointment is effective July 1. Nurse is succeeding Bill Ransom who recently announced his retirement.

Story continues after the ad

In his new role, Nurse will be responsible for overseeing the station’s operations, as well as its various programming and sales functions.  Nurse has served as WKBW station manager and VP of sales for the past 11 years.

Nurse is a broadcasting veteran with extensive management experience having served as general manager for television stations in Boston and Washington, D.C. Nurse began his career at WRKO-AM in Boston, and has previously worked at 24/7 Real Media, an Internet advertising and technology company, as the SVP of sales and marketing.

Brand Connections

Comments (3) -

Pat Pattison posted over 2 years ago
Congratulations Mike, couldn't happen to a nicer and more qualified guy.
Frank Jazzo posted over 2 years ago
Mike, congratulations on the promotion. Frank
teddy64 Nickname posted over 2 years ago
Well the previous management destroyed one of America's great TV stations..The prototype to Good Morning America was their morning show..Granite needs to sell!!


Marketshare Blog Playout Blog




Overnights, adults 18-49 for October 5, 2015
  • 1.
  • 2.
  • 3.
  • 4.
  • 5.
  • 6.
Source: Nielsen


  • Gail Pennington

    Kudos to Neil Patrick Harris for trying to bring something different to TV, and to NBC for being open to the idea. But Best Time Ever With Neil Patrick Harris wasn't much of a good time, let alone "the best." Best Time Ever has been described as a variety show, but the reality was more comedy-game-prank show, with segments that felt like outtakes from Fallon or Kimmel, or possibly from Harris' failed Oscars gig.

  • Rob Owen

    Good thing FX executives opted to air the first two episodes of The Bastard Executioner together as a two-hour premiere: The first hour offers a sometimes confusing mix of violent battles, sex, mysticism, scenes of torture, child murders, world-building and a defecating villain before the more gripping, grounded second hour that gives a better sense of the show’s direction going forward. Complex, sometimes convoluted storytelling is popular these days — see HBO’s Game of Thrones — so there’s certainly a place for The Bastard Executioner, which may still settle in and become more comprehensible as it goes.

  • Mark Perigard

    In the dog days of August, just a few weeks before the fall season begins, NBC sneaks in an un­heralded sitcom. You, the savvy viewer, are expecting the primetime equivalent of a turkey surprise. But The Carmichael Show on NBC is something different, a show about an African-­American family that manages to draw on and update the bite of All in the Family and the silli­ness of its spinoff, The Jeffersons.

  • Mike Hale

    Edward Burns’s new series, Public Morals on TNT, is set in Hell’s Kitchen in the 1960s and filmed in New York, at Silvercup Studios and at locations like the Russian Tea Room, the Park Lane Hotel and Barrow’s Pub in Greenwich Village. It doesn’t seem to take place anywhere in the real world, though. That wouldn’t be a bad thing if Burns had the imagination to pull it off, but the 10-episode Public Morals is a mess. Written by, directed by and starring Burns, it’s an even stronger argument than the second season of True Detective against the auteur impulse in television.

  • Hank Stuever

    Whether its star intends it this way or not, TV Land’s The Jim Gaffigan Show will correctly be perceived as a sunnier answer to the cloudy-day tendencies of FX’s Louie. Gaffigan’s world is much less artful, more straight-on and also culled from his real life. Gaffigan has perfected his shtick, mixing deep sarcasm and negativity with a fine-line inoffensiveness. It works as a stage presence, but not so much as a TV character.

  • David Wiegand

    Denis Leary’s new FX sitcom, Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll, would have been everything he hopes it could be if he’d made it 20 years ago. Maybe even earlier. S&D&R&R has several things going for it that make it passably enjoyable, including some funny dialogue, good performances and, of course, Leary’s trademark grumpy charm. But many viewers are right to expect something more and fresher from Leary.

This advertisement will close automatically in  second(s). You will see this ad no more than once a day. Skip ad