Dmas 85 & 153

Rentrak Adds Three Quincy-Owned Stations

The ratings service adds Quincy's ABC affiliate WKOW Madison, Wis., and NBC-Fox duo of KTTC-KXLT Rochester/Austin, Minnesota-Mason City, Iowa.
By
TVNewsCheck,

Rentrak Corp. today announced a multi-year local TV ratings contract with Quincy Newspapers Inc. for three stations — WKOW (ABC)  Madison, Wis. (DMA 85),  and KTTC (NBC) and KXLT (Fox)  Rochester/Austin, Minnesota-Mason City, Iowa (DMA 153).

"We have used Rentrak in the past for various studies outside of the traditional four sweeps and we have been pleased with their process and approach,” said Chuck Roth, Qunicy’s director of business administration. “They have been easy to work with and prompt with providing the information. We felt the time was right to add their full service in two of our markets, and look forward to expanding our relationship with them."

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Rentrak's television ratings measurement service provides daily measurement of all TV networks nationally and at a granular level for TV stations in all 210 media markets nationwide. The service incorporates information from more than 20 million TV sets and integrates satellite, telco and cable TV viewing data.

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Ratings

Overnights, adults 18-49 for October 29, 2014
  • 1.
    5.5/16
  • 2.
    2.2/6
  • 3.
    2.0/6
  • 4.
    1.0/3
  • 5.
    1.0/3
  • 6.
    0.8/2
Source: Nielsen
Reviews
Opinions
Features
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