It's Official: NBC Stations Getting Cozi

The new multicast channel featuring a mix of classic TV shows, movies and original programming will debut on the 10 NBC Owned Television Stations early next year and the group is looking for affiliates in other markets.
TVNewsCheck,

NBC Owned Television Stations confirmed today that it is launching early next year a multicast channel mixing classic TV with hit movies and original national and local programming.

Chicago TV blogger Robert Feder had the scoop on Cozi TV last week.

Story continues after the ad

The 24/7 channel will be carried on the 10 NBC O&Os and the group is actively seeking affiliates in other markets.

Cozi TV is actually a relaunch of the Nonstop Network, a multicast channel with national original programming and a smattering of original local programming. The Nonstop Network, in turn, was a roll up of local Nonstop channels that several NBC stations had launched.

Cozi TV retains some of the DNA of the original Nonstop concept. Stations may preempt the national programming to run news, sports and other programming of local interest, says Meredith McGinn, VP of multi-station local programming for NBC Owned Television Stations, who will lead the new network. "This is a local station. We want broadcasters to embrace this channel as their own and to localize it."

Nonstop was a "great testing ground," McGinn says. "We proved that compelling shows like Talk Stoop can work and resonate in the market and in sales. We are proud to keep in on the schedule."

Brand Connections

Cozi TV is entering a multicast market that is already crowded with channels that rely to one extent or another on classic TV shows or movies.

"Imitation is the sincerest form of television," says Neal Sabin of Weigel Broadcasting, which owns Me-TV and distributes MGM's ThisTV. Me-TV schedules classic TV. ThisTV is mostly movies.

"We set out to make Me-TV the definitive destination for classic TV. Maybe there is a niche in the marketplace for a channel with some classic TV, some first-run programming and some movies," Sabin says.

According to Sabin, Me-TV and ThisTV reach more than 80% of TV homes. From carriage on the NBC stations, Cozi TV starts with a reach of nearly 27%.

Cozi TV is different than the other channels, McGinn says. "We are combining genres. They seem to be segmented.... And we have been willing to invest in some fantastic series that they haven't been."

NBC is offering other broadcasters five minutes of barter time each hour to carry the network, McGinn says.

McGinn is also promising to heavily promote the channel. "We are focusing on creating a great experience for the audience," she says. "We are going to be producing vignettes and interstitials in addition to regular promos to make sure the audience is engaged in the content and is just having fun every time they come to the channel."

The Cozi TV's classic TV shows will come from the libraries of NBCUniversal and other top syndicators, McGinn says. The press release included these titles: Magnum, P.I., The Bionic Woman, Highway to Heaven, Lone Ranger and The Six Million Dollar Man.

Cozi TV will also air a wide range of movies, showcasing iconic actors spanning generations, including legends Rock Hudson and Doris Day as well as contemporary actors like George Clooney and Drew Barrymore.

“We’re excited to make a significant investment in well-known premium movie titles and TV shows — many of which haven’t been seen in years — as well as high quality original programming to create Cozi TV,” said Valari Staab, president of NBC Owned Television Stations in a statement.

“This new network will provide local stations an opportunity to give their viewers rare access to some of the greatest hits of all time with minimal distraction from their main focus of delivering local news and information.”

Tags

Comments (2) -

RBM8 Nickname posted over 2 years ago
It would be great if NBC offers stations the Cozi TV feed without a network logo in the corner of the screen, and if affiliates pass along this feed to viewers without adding a local channel ID bug during the programs. Have a quick eight or twelve second legal local station ID at the top and bottom of the hour, and then fade it off. Tribune does this with Antenna TV in some markets, and it's a pleasure to watch the shows/movies without an annoying constant on-screen logo.
KaiSen Nickname posted over 2 years ago
Yet another digital network we're probably not getting in my part of the world. Then again, WAVY might be inclined to move Bounce over to WVBT to make room for it, who knows? I still want ME-TV around here too. Until then, still happy with Antenna TV. What a great channel, and it's good to see Cozi TV using library programming. Just hoping Cozi won't take away Dragnet, Adam-12, Jack Benny, and Alfred Hitchcock from Antenna TV.
Marketshare Blog Playout Blog

Twitter

TVNewsCheck

Ratings

Overnights, adults 18-49 for March 1, 2015
  • 1.
    1.8/5
  • 2.
    1.6/5
  • 3.
    1.2/4
  • 4.
    1.0/3
  • 5.
    1.0/3
  • 6.
    0.4/1
Source: Nielsen

Reviews

  • Mark Perigard

    ABC’s Secrets and Lies is the second network TV series adapted from an Australian hit to focus on violence against a child in a month. NBC’s The Slap is self-explanatory and rich in character. With a title such as Secrets and Lies, ABC’s newest limited series is going for something a bit more salacious, but anyone hoping for a Desperate Housewives vibe (ABC’s last big Sunday hit) will be disappointed. This story unfolds as if it were told by someone overdosing on Ambien.

  • Rob Owen

    It's hard to imagine Fox's funny, entertaining and pretty original Last Man on Earth becoming a hit, but the same could have at one time been said about The Lego Movie and the screen version of 21 Jump Street, so you never can tell. Writers Chris Miller and Phil Lord had a hand in all three, and it's fair to say if you liked their movies, you'll probably dig this new TV comedy, too. Creatively, there's no question Last Man on Earth is a winner, a unique comedy in a sea of sitcoms viewers have seen before. But being original is also risky.

  • Tom Conroy

    CBS’s new crime dramedy Battle Creek is yet another detective series featuring two mismatched partners who are destined to achieve a grudging respect. Battle Creek might be able to survive on the strengths of its two charismatic lead actors, but the perfunctory mystery in the premiere suggests that the lack of creativity will do them in. That lack is all the more surprising because the writers of the episode are Vince Gilligan, the creator of Breaking Bad, and David Shore, the creator of House, both of which were innovative series.

  • David Hinckley

    When they  talk about the great folk music troubadours and carriers of the 20th century, too often they mention Woody Guthrie and A.P. Carter and the Lomaxes, then leave out Lead Belly. Huddie Ledbetter, grandson of slaves, is described in Smithsonian Channel's new documentary Legend of Lead Belly as a "human jukebox," an artist who listened to all the music around him, absorbed it and distilled it into an enormous body of his own work.

  • Brian Lowry

    With Two and a Half Men signing off, CBS will try to fill the void by shrinking the formula to two admittedly very familiar men, named Felix and Oscar. Matthew Perry completes his potentially dubious post-Friends hat trick — having starred in comedies for NBC and ABC as well — with this reboot of The Odd Couple, a beloved series that still derives some kick from Neil Simon’s blueprint, but also feels especially dated in this day and age, what with Felix as the nonsexual spouse, essentially, to Oscar’s slovenly husband. Good casting provides some hope, but this still feels oh-so-20th century.

  • Alessandra Stanley

    AMC's Better Call Saul revolves around Saul Goodman (Bob Odenkirk), the shady lawyer of Walter White, the hero of Breaking Bad, and is set roughly six years before the two men meet. It’s common to dread a spinoff; some succeed, but plenty disappoint. There is absolutely no need to worry about this prequel to the Breaking Bad canon. Better Call Saul traces in loving, if corrosive, detail how Jimmy McGill, a debt-ridden, ambulance-chasing loser, changed his name to Saul Goodman and became a drug-lord consigliere. Better Call Saul is better than good: It’s delightful — in a brutal, darkly comic way, of course.

This advertisement will close automatically in  second(s). You will see this ad no more than once a day. Skip ad