DMA 43

NRJ TV Snags WGCB Harrisburg For $9M

The spectrum speculator has bought six other stations with the intention of selling the spectrum to wireless carriers through the FCC's planned "incentive auction."
TVNewsCheck,

Spectrum speculator NRJ TV has purchased WGCB Harrisburg-Lancaster-Lebanon-York, Pa., from Red Lion Television for $9 million, according to an FCC filing seeking approval of the deal.

NRJ, headed by Ted Bartley, has been buying TV stations in or near major markets in hopes of flipping them at a profit in the FCC's planned "incentive auction" of TV spectrum. Hoping to shift spectrum from TV to wireless broadband, the FCC plans to set up a method by which broadcasters can voluntarily auction their spectrum and split the proceeds with the government.

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So far, NRJ has accumulated six other stations: KCNS San Francisco, WMFP Boston, WZME New York, WTVE Philadelphia, KIKU Honolulu and KSCI Los Angeles.

WGCB is an independent stations that offers of mix of classic TV shows and religion. It carries Me-TV on a subchannel.

Red Lion is owned Anna L. Plourde-Norris, president (40%), and the estate of John H. Norris (60%).

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Ratings

Overnights, adults 18-49 for May 25, 2016
  • 1.
    1.2/5
  • 2.
    1.1/4
  • 3.
    1.1/4
  • 4.
    0.9/3
  • 5.
    0.8/3
  • 6.
    0.6/2
Source: Nielsen

Reviews

  • Neil Genzlinger

    Bryan Cranston brings his Tony Award-winning interpretation of President Lyndon B. Johnson to television in an adaptation of the Robert Schenkkan play All the Way, and it’s still quite a sight to behold, just as it was on Broadway in 2014. Nothing beats witnessing this kind of larger-than-life portrayal onstage, of course. But the television version, presented by HBO, offers plenty of rewards, allowing Cranston to work the close-ups and liberating him from the confines of a theater set. Cranston’s performance is a gem — in his hands, this accidental president comes across as an amazing bundle of contradictions, someone who seems at once too vulgar for the job and just right for it.

  • Dominic Patten

    There are a lot of good things to say about the near-perfect The Night Manager. But it’s best to cut to the core and say that the Susanne Bier-directed miniseries is simply great television. Now, co-production already played in the UK earlier this year where it was a ratings hit and cultural phenomenon. No doubts as to why. The six-part series airing in the U.S. on AMC starring Hugh Laurie, Tom Hiddleston, Olivia Colman and Elizabeth Debicki is worthy of all of the accolades and adjectives with which one can praise a show – and this in an era of TV excellence. The actors are all consistently at their very best here, with Oscar winner Bier never better behind the camera. Watch Night Manager week by week or in one DVR’d binge, but don’t miss the excellence that is this adaptation of John le Carré’s 1993 novel — you will be the lesser for it if you do.

  • Mark Dawidziak

    From the first frame, it's clear that Jackie Robinson is a genuine labor of love. The warmly crafted two-part, four-hour PBS documentary from filmmaker Ken Burns positively glows with its admiration for the man and his accomplishments. Unabashedly positive in its overall approach? Yes, and Burns is somewhat old-fashioned in that regard. He believes that admiration is a good and legitimate reason to compose a biography of someone. He's not going to apologize for that. That doesn't mean you ignore the flaws and frailties. But Burns, like historian David McCullough, maintains that biographies can celebrate worthy American lives, not merely tear them down.

  • Robert Bianco

    NBC is clearly betting a show that’s merely pleasant can survive in a crowded TV universe. And who knows, with Crowded, NBC could be right. Certainly pleasant is in short supply these days. Admittedly, “undemanding” is not exactly a strong endorsement, and NBC is unlikely to build an ad campaign around the show freeing you from weekly commitment pressure. But it’s something. And here’s something else, and something better, Crowded has to offer: Patrick Warburton and Carrie Preston, two of TV's most skilled and appealing actors. Put them together, and you have the strongest inducement to make room for their sitcom. Two may not count as a crowd, but these two just may be enough for Crowded.

  • Mark Perigard

    WGN America’s new drama Underground might be about the Underground Railroad, but its makers, including executive producer John Legend, aren’t content to coast on a bit of riveting 19th century history. They’ve crafted a caper show with fascinating characters. This is Prison Break on a Georgia plantation, with a dollop of Scandal-size surprises. Underground looks to be the most addictive new show of spring.

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