DMA 43

NRJ TV Snags WGCB Harrisburg For $9M

The spectrum speculator has bought six other stations with the intention of selling the spectrum to wireless carriers through the FCC's planned "incentive auction."
TVNewsCheck,

Spectrum speculator NRJ TV has purchased WGCB Harrisburg-Lancaster-Lebanon-York, Pa., from Red Lion Television for $9 million, according to an FCC filing seeking approval of the deal.

NRJ, headed by Ted Bartley, has been buying TV stations in or near major markets in hopes of flipping them at a profit in the FCC's planned "incentive auction" of TV spectrum. Hoping to shift spectrum from TV to wireless broadband, the FCC plans to set up a method by which broadcasters can voluntarily auction their spectrum and split the proceeds with the government.

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So far, NRJ has accumulated six other stations: KCNS San Francisco, WMFP Boston, WZME New York, WTVE Philadelphia, KIKU Honolulu and KSCI Los Angeles.

WGCB is an independent stations that offers of mix of classic TV shows and religion. It carries Me-TV on a subchannel.

Red Lion is owned Anna L. Plourde-Norris, president (40%), and the estate of John H. Norris (60%).

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Ratings

Overnights, adults 18-49 for September 3, 2015
  • 1.
    1.9/7
  • 2.
    1.3/5
  • 3.
    1.3/4
  • 4.
    1.2/4
  • 5.
    0.8/3
  • 6.
    0.5/2
Source: Nielsen

Reviews

  • Mark Perigard

    In the dog days of August, just a few weeks before the fall season begins, NBC sneaks in an un­heralded sitcom. You, the savvy viewer, are expecting the primetime equivalent of a turkey surprise. But The Carmichael Show on NBC is something different, a show about an African-­American family that manages to draw on and update the bite of All in the Family and the silli­ness of its spinoff, The Jeffersons.

  • Mike Hale

    Edward Burns’s new series, Public Morals on TNT, is set in Hell’s Kitchen in the 1960s and filmed in New York, at Silvercup Studios and at locations like the Russian Tea Room, the Park Lane Hotel and Barrow’s Pub in Greenwich Village. It doesn’t seem to take place anywhere in the real world, though. That wouldn’t be a bad thing if Burns had the imagination to pull it off, but the 10-episode Public Morals is a mess. Written by, directed by and starring Burns, it’s an even stronger argument than the second season of True Detective against the auteur impulse in television.

  • Mark Perigard

    Maybe Craig Robinson owes money to the head of NBC programming. Or maybe Craig Robinson is being blackmailed by NBC for some nefarious reason. There must be a rational explanation for why he’d agree to star in Mr. Robinson, a dreary show that has all the edge of a doughnut hole and comes slathered with an astonishing amount of sexual innuendo for a network sitcom.

  • Hank Stuever

    Whether its star intends it this way or not, TV Land’s The Jim Gaffigan Show will correctly be perceived as a sunnier answer to the cloudy-day tendencies of FX’s Louie. Gaffigan’s world is much less artful, more straight-on and also culled from his real life. Gaffigan has perfected his shtick, mixing deep sarcasm and negativity with a fine-line inoffensiveness. It works as a stage presence, but not so much as a TV character.

  • David Wiegand

    Denis Leary’s new FX sitcom, Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll, would have been everything he hopes it could be if he’d made it 20 years ago. Maybe even earlier. S&D&R&R has several things going for it that make it passably enjoyable, including some funny dialogue, good performances and, of course, Leary’s trademark grumpy charm. But many viewers are right to expect something more and fresher from Leary.

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