DMA 43

NRJ TV Snags WGCB Harrisburg For $9M

The spectrum speculator has bought six other stations with the intention of selling the spectrum to wireless carriers through the FCC's planned "incentive auction."
TVNewsCheck,

Spectrum speculator NRJ TV has purchased WGCB Harrisburg-Lancaster-Lebanon-York, Pa., from Red Lion Television for $9 million, according to an FCC filing seeking approval of the deal.

NRJ, headed by Ted Bartley, has been buying TV stations in or near major markets in hopes of flipping them at a profit in the FCC's planned "incentive auction" of TV spectrum. Hoping to shift spectrum from TV to wireless broadband, the FCC plans to set up a method by which broadcasters can voluntarily auction their spectrum and split the proceeds with the government.

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So far, NRJ has accumulated six other stations: KCNS San Francisco, WMFP Boston, WZME New York, WTVE Philadelphia, KIKU Honolulu and KSCI Los Angeles.

WGCB is an independent stations that offers of mix of classic TV shows and religion. It carries Me-TV on a subchannel.

Red Lion is owned Anna L. Plourde-Norris, president (40%), and the estate of John H. Norris (60%).

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Ratings

Overnights, adults 18-49 for September 21, 2014
  • 1.
    5.6/16
  • 2.
    3.8/11
  • 3.
    1.2/4
  • 4.
    0.7/2
  • 5.
    0.6/2
  • 6.
    0.3/1
Source: Nielsen
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