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KNBC Los Angeles Expands Noon News

The NBC O&O is also making staffing changes to its early morning news show Today in LA with the addition of Michael Brownlee.
By
TVNewsCheck,

KNBC Los Angeles is expanding its NBC4 News at Noon to a full hour and shuffling its anchor lineup.

The NBC Owned Television Stations outlet is also making staffing changes to its early morning news show Today in LA with the addition of Michael Brownlee. He will co-anchor the show with Alycia Lane, who’s replacing Kathy Vara. Vara is now the station’s weekend news anchor.

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KNBC, like other NBC Owned Television Stations, has been undergoing dramatic changes since Valari Staab joined the company just over a year ago. This fall, KNBC and other NBC stations are adding two new syndicated talk shows to their afternoon lineups: CBS Television Distribution’s Jeff Probst and NBCUniversal’s Steve Harvey. The shows will lead into Warner Bros.’ long-running Ellen.

At KNBC, Carlston has brought in 16 new employees to the station’s newsroom since joining the company about a year ago. That includes Todd Mokhtari, who joined the station as VP of news a few months ago.

“It’s part of NBC4’s culture to produce high-quality news content for Southern California’s unique audience,” said Mokhtari, in a statement. “These changes reflect our priority to deliver on that tradition every day, every newscast.”

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Ratings

Overnights, adults 18-49 for December 18, 2014
  • 1.
    1.8/6
  • 2.
    1.0/3
  • 3.
    0.9/3
  • 4.
    0.8/3
  • 5.
    0.7/2
  • 6.
    0.6/2
Source: Nielsen
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