CBS Going Mobile; Joins MCV, Mobile500

Three of the group’s stations will participate in the Mobile Content Venture’s Dyle service and its KSTW Seattle is joining the Mobile500 Alliance.
By
TVNewsCheck,

Through the participation of four of its stations, CBS will join broadcasting's two mobile DTV initiatives, which are working to bring live broadcast television to viewers on their smartphone and tablets.

KTVT Dallas, WFOR Miami and KCAL Los Angeles will participate in the Dyle mobile TV service.

Story continues after the ad

Dyle is operated by Mobile Content Venture (MCV), a joint venture of 12 major broadcast groups including Belo Corp., Cox Media Group, E.W. Scripps Co., Gannett Broadcasting, Hearst Television, Media General, Meredith Corp., Post-Newsweek Stations and Raycom Media, all of which are part of an independent entity known as Pearl LLC, as well as Fox, Ion Television and NBC. 

KSTW Seattle will join the Mobile500 Alliance, which represents 50 TV groups with 437 stations, including Fisher, Hubbard, LIN and Sinclair Broadcasting. The Mobile500 Alliance stations reach 94% of U.S. TV households.

“The advent of digital television has been great for viewers and we are pleased to support these initiatives with the hope that they will help us to do an even better job of serving our audience through the delivery of our broadcasts to mobile devices,” said Peter Dunn, president, CBS Television Stations.

“Given CBS’s leadership in advocating for broadcast network television, we are pleased to support these ventures, both of which are led in large part by our affiliate partners,” said Diana Wilkin, president, CBS affiliate relations.

Brand Connections

Tags

Comments (3) -

RustbeltAlumnus2 Nickname posted over 3 years ago
Why does the dyle.tv website say "check back" for a list of enabled devices? Is this a case of the chicken or the egg?
BroadbandisBest Nickname posted over 3 years ago
I am totally mystified by Dyle and mobile TV in general, at least as envisioned by the MCV. I feel as if I must be missing something or am too stupid to grasp the concept. I have now and have had for a few years the ability to watch my home TV channels when I’m almost anywhere in the world or at a sporting event in (or not in) my home market or when I’m riding on the train to NYC or driving around in my car/truck, or in a hotel in Moscow. I simply have a 3G or 4G phone with SlingBox on it and I’ve watched local sporting events or local news or content that I’ve recorded on my DVR or on-demand movies from FiOS or movie channels like HBO or whatever content I’ve wanted to watch. I can also watch any of the cable channels that I have on my FiOS TV service. I paid about $30 for a one-time fee for the SlingBox app on an iPhone and on an Android device and it works almost perfectly. I am not paying any additional subscription fee for the video content, although I am paying for the FiOS subscription and for the data usage on my phone(s) but I have never, ever gone over my data limit and incurred additional charges. Since I am a FiOS subscriber the local broadcaster is getting paid something through retransmission, perhaps about $12/year per channel. Furthermore, I only pay for the data usage when I’m in 3G or 4G coverage. When I’m using my phone(s) in my home or at my office (or in that hotel in Moscow) I have Wi-Fi so none of that data usage is being charged against my allotment. At some sporting events I’ve noticed that there are Wi-Fi networks available although I’ve never tried those, but I’ve never had a problem maintaining a connection even though I see several others doing the same thing that I am doing. In addition, on these devices I can get to the Internet, check my email, make reservations for a restaurant, pay some bills or whatever I can do at my home computer and in some instances I can do that while also maintaining the connection to watch the video on SlingBox. Even without SlingBox it is possible to see several live streamed events over the web on a 3G/4G device. In fact, I think this is now possible with the NFL Sunday Ticket for NFL games, but I don’t have an NFL Sunday Ticket subscription so I have no first-hand experience with this. Recently, I was using NASCAR’s TrackPass while at a little league baseball game. I live in metro Washington and when I put in my zip code on the Dyle site, it says that there is no service available although there clearly are stations that are Dyle stations in Washington. Not sure what that means since if I put in a DC zip code I see that stations are available. I can receive OTA DC signals at my home. Then, when I do research on Dyle it seems that they intended to have devices available at the end of 2011 but apparently do not have devices yet available. I visited the mobile TV booths at CES 2012 and was very, very disappointed in what I saw, but, more importantly, I visited those booths three times over three days and there never was anyone there. Others must have been disappointed also. What did Qualcomm get wrong with Flo? I honestly don’t know. Is Dyle some reinvention of Flo? I am unclear how the final Dyle devices and service will operate? Are they connected to my phone (this dongle was shown at CES)? Is it a separate device (also shown at CES)? Is there a subscription fee? There is not much on the Dyle web site to explain the service, but thank goodness the lawyers have defined the service and the burdens to be place on the users. Read this curious Legal statement at http://www.dyle.tv/legal/. Must I agree to a legal document about undefined services (although defined perfectly by the legal minds that wrote it) that I may or may not need to pay for. Again, I wonder what it all means. Back in the late 1980’s and 1990’s I had a portable Casio NTSC TV that was a handheld, battery-powered device that I took to football games so that I could watch the replays on the TV and listen to the play-by-play and commentary. It worked fine. Broadcasters also seem to continue to be enamored with real time broadcasting when actually, I think, most people want the video that they want when they want it, not what is necessarily being broadcast by the TV station. I thought that we resolved this years ago. Broadcasters also seem bent on separating their service from The Network. Why should broadcasters try to buck the Internet? Most companies have embraced the Internet as a good thing for their business. Broadcasters are still discussing the nature of the transmission standard that was set in 1996. Maybe I’m wrong, but I seem to recall that when MCV was launched it was announced that there would be co-heads from Fox and NBC. Now there is a marriage made in heaven! There are few startups that are successful when there are two companies trying to control it. But, thank goodness they have legally defined the services and the “Terms of Service.” I see at NAB this week there will be demonstrations where “people can watch TV on the go.” What a concept! I think that I did this about 20 years ago and have continued to do so. What am I missing?
HearTVInCars Nickname posted over 3 years ago
I can hardly 'not' wait.

Classifieds

Marketshare Blog Playout Blog

Twitter

TVNewsCheck

Ratings

Overnights, adults 18-49 for April 19, 2015
  • 1.
    3.0/9
  • 2.
    1.4/4
  • 3.
    1.1/3
  • 4.
    0.8/2
  • 5.
    0.7/2
  • 6.
    0.3/1
Source: Nielsen

Reviews

  • Joanne Ostrow

    Two Jews walk into a bar .... There's no punchline. It's a silly, sentimental episode of FX's The Comedians in which Billy Crystal and Josh Gad sing karaoke in L.A.'s Little Tokyo and reminisce about aging, family and the nature of comedy. The generation gap provides the crux of a comedy collaboration by Crystal (old-school Borscht Belt) and Gad (youthful Broadway) that is by turns gently narcissistic, occasionally gross and musically inclined. The 13 episodes are fun, not groundbreaking, but slickly produced and accented with musical comedy. Like the two stars, the series is endearing, loud and desperate for attention, but ultimately a love letter to comedy and comedy history.

  • David Wiegand

    Kings, queens, presidents and dictators all have official histories, but power brokers, as they embody the precepts of Machiavelli, often operate in whole or part behind the scenes. Henry VIII takes second billing in PBS's Wolf Hall, the sprawling six-hour adaptation of two historical novels by Hilary Mantel. The miniseries is both brilliant and maddening and only really pays off in the final two episodes, after you’ve more or less figured out who the characters are, how they’re related to each other, and what the hell they are saying during endless, slow-moving conversations spoken, of course, in what to many Yanks is a foreign tongue: British English.

  • David Hinckley

    HBO's four-hour documentary Sinatra: All or Nothing at All captures all the singer's swash and buckle. It also reminds us, in a smart way, that Sinatra became one of the four or five best popular singers of the 20th century. In other words, director Alex Gibney hasn’t set out to make headlines by focusing on the flaws or the dark side of a life that had plenty of both.

  • Brian Lowry

    NBC describes American Odyssey as “Traffic-like,” which might explain the lack of inspiration permeating this multi-pronged drama, which, much like sibling USA’s Dig, hinges on a vast (and tedious) conspiracy. The intersecting threads involve a U.S. soldier in North Africa, a corporate lawyer and an Occupy-type political activist, each embroiled in a monstrous plot reaching up and into government. First-rate casting — including Anna Friel, Peter Facinelli and Treat Williams — can’t obscure the been-there, seen-that sensation, which doesn’t spur much curiosity about how these tentacles connect or offer much hope the show will last long enough to find out.

  • Ed Bark

    Quotation marks should be used as disqualifiers whenever the “Church” of Scientology is put into print. This is no more a “Church” than an apple is an orange. But it’s been recognized as such by the IRS. How and why make for one of the more startling and dismaying segments in Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief. It’s an extraordinary investigative documentary with the power to provoke anger, astonishment and any number of other strong emotions. HBO, despite an organized campaign of threats and intimidation from the “religion’s” legions of automatons, will premiere the two-hour film on Sunday, March 29. Must-see television? That’s an understatement.

  • Mark Perigard

    It’s the Walking Dead/Quincy/Psych mashup you didn’t know you wanted. But give iZombie a chance. You just might love it. CW, home to the DC Comics hits Arrow and Flash, dips into the medium again for this horror dramedy loosely based on the book from DC’s mature reader imprint Vertigo. iZombie is superbly cast and displays wit and surprises you don’t often find in the comics-to-TV genre.

  • Rob Owen

    Just a few weeks ago Netflix debuted The Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, a smart, funny series originally ordered by NBC and then sold off to Netflix when NBC executives realized they were cultivating a schedule that couldn’t possibly abide intelligent comedy. So in its place viewers get the Ellen DeGeneres-executive produced One Big Happy, a truly dreadful comedy that is the antithesis of Kimmy Schmidt. Obvious, dumb and mostly unfunny, One Big Happy is an embarrassment for all involved. It won’t have a happy ending. For all involved, it will be best if it just fails quickly and then quietly disappears.

  • David Hinckley

    Mark Schwahn has accomplished the near-impossible feat of making fake British royals behave worse than the real ones. Also, wisely, E!'s The Royals, a big new soapy drama about a fictional British royal family, isn’t populated with characters who mirror specific individuals in the real-life ruling Windsors. The quirks and neuroses are more mix-and-match.

  • Rob Owen

    TV fans who decry the dearth of quality comedies, especially viewers who appreciated NBC’s late 30 Rock, will revel in the first Netflix half-hour comedy series, the Tina Fey-produced Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt. Originally developed and ordered by NBC, the show segued to Netflix once NBC executives realized they didn’t have an obvious, hospitable place to put it on NBC’s primetime schedule. In other words, it was too smart/too weird a fit for NBC’s more mainstream fare. It’s a smart, funny series, and it’s a relief to know Netflix saved it from what was sure to be terminal neglect had it aired on NBC.

  • James Poniewozik

    ABC's American Crime is, like a lot of TV drama lately — Secrets and Lies, Broadchurch, The Killing — built around a murder. Someone has been killed, suspects have been apprehended, no one is sure yet what went down and why. But while the first four episodes of the series are gripping, and each introduces new complexity to a sweeping story, I would not call it a murder mystery. And that’s precisely why it works.

This advertisement will close automatically in  second(s). You will see this ad no more than once a day. Skip ad