IB Introduces New Digital Publishing Platform

Newsroom-centric content management system ibPublish 2 is designed to simplify digital publishing processes and seamlessly distributes content to mobile and social channels.
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TVNewsCheck,

Internet Broadcasting, a provider of digital publishing technology and services for local TV newsrooms, today introduced ibPublish 2, which it calls “the most advanced digital content management and publishing platform built for the TV broadcast industry and designed for the future of digital publishing.”

ibPublish 2 is a cloud-based architected solution that lets newsrooms produce news and information with fast distribution to mobile and social media channels.

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The platform is already in production with Internet Broadcasting clients, who are being supported with services including planning, migration, training, best practices and custom development.

“Television broadcasters are seeking to leverage the investments and talents they devote to content development in new ways — so they can further strengthen their brand and engage their audiences,” said Elmer Baldwin, president-CEO of Internet Broadcasting. “ibPublish 2 responds by automating the publication process and supporting simultaneous publishing across mobile devices. That frees broadcasters to focus on their core competence — developing great local-news content — and helps make digital journalism profitable.”

The ibPublish 2 platform offers these features:

  • Dramatic simplification of digital publishing: Accelerates time to publish with high-powered tools for super users and simplified workflows for other contributors, enabling the entire organization to publish digital content.
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  • Superior user experience improves audience engagement: High-performing, fast-loading pages deliver exceptional user experience, while dynamic and contextual publishing capabilities extend engagement.
  • Genuinely integrated mobile and social: Fully integrated apps and mobile Web sites offers seamless multi-channel publishing, on-the-fly content and display changes, campaign management and social enabled by a robust suite of APIs.
  • Adaptive platform provides full spectrum of control: Publishers have complete control with fully customizable digital solutions and the ability to add new products — all enabled by the cloud-based platform.

ibPublish 2 incorporates software and services from technology partners, including  CoreMedia, a provider of Web content management (WCM) software; Kaltura, a video platform, providing video management, publishing, authoring, distribution and monetization solutions for media companies, enterprises, educational institutions and service providers; and Akamai, a cloud-based platform designed to help provide secure, high-performing user experiences on any device.

In addition, ibPublish 2 supports other technology and service partners in order to provide additional functionality and content such as national news, sports and weather.

“We have integrated technologies that form a development community aligned in the best interests of Internet Broadcasting clients and the market we serve,” Baldwin added. “This community reflects the efforts of hundreds of talented developers and engineers and is supported by a company that has been servicing TV broadcasters’ needs for more than 15 years.”

“Local publishers have arguably the most complex set of needs of any digital publisher,” said Roger Keating, SVP, digital media, for Hearst Television and an Internet Broadcasting director. “Given the volume of content, the number of iterations, and the very distributed nature of what we're publishing, we demand a lot from a publishing system — and the tasks for which we are looking to a digital publishing platform to support us have grown in complexity.

“Internet Broadcasting has taken on the challenge of fully retooling their publishing platform to meet our needs — not just for this year, but for the next decade.”

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Ratings

Overnights, adults 18-49 for March 1, 2015
  • 1.
    1.8/5
  • 2.
    1.6/5
  • 3.
    1.2/4
  • 4.
    1.0/3
  • 5.
    1.0/3
  • 6.
    0.4/1
Source: Nielsen

Reviews

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  • Brian Lowry

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  • Alessandra Stanley

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