Bellum Entertainment To Distribute 'America Now'

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TVNewsCheck,

America Now, the syndicated daily newsmagazine show co-hosted by Leeza Gibbons and Bill Rancic from ITV Studios America and Raycom Media, today announced a new distribution team.

Mary Carole McDonnell’s Bellum Entertainment has taken over the distribution for the series. Boots Walker has joined Bellum as vice president of sales. She and Boyd McDonnell, vice president of programming, will lead the team of five sales representatives to expand its outreach. Starting this month, the show has a new primetime clearance on Adell Broadcasting’s independent WADL Detroit (DMA 11).

“We have been so gratified by the positive response to America Now, and we feel extremely fortunate to begin 2012 with such great news to announce,” said Paul McTear, president-CEO of Raycom Media. “We’re excited about what adding Detroit … and confident that adding Bellum to our team will succeed in bringing the show to even more viewers.”

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America Now airs weekdays in 45 markets.

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Wil Roddy posted over 4 years ago
Good luck with the show, it has potential..
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Ratings

Overnights, adults 18-49 for February 11, 2016
  • 1.
    2.1/7
  • 2.
    2.1/7
  • 3.
    1.9/6
  • 4.
    1.1/4
  • 5.
    0.7/2
  • 6.
    0.7/2
Source: Nielsen

Reviews

  • Jeff Jensen

    He huffs, he puffs, he snorts yards of blow up his nose. He’s Richie Finestra, flailing founder of an imploding record company, American Century, and he’s exactly what TV doesn’t need right now — one more anguished, toxic, middle-aged male anti-hero raging against the dying light of his powers. Played by Bobby Cannavale with a ferociousness that sucks you in even as it wears you down, Richie is the black hole center of HBO's Vinyl, a drama set in ‘70s New York at the dawn of punk and hip-hop, produced by the super-group of Martin Scorsese, Terence Winter (Boardwalk Empire), Rich Cohen and Mick Jagger. It’s a sometimes thrilling period piece dulled by new century Bleak TV blah blah blah.

  • Mark Perigard

    With thanks to "sweet baby Jesus" for allowing her to premiere during a "deranged" election season, veteran Daily Show correspondent Samantha Bee launched her own comedy news show Full Frontal with Samantha Bee on TBS. In the closing segment, she sent a “foreign exchange producer” to gauge the level of support for Jeb Bush, who can’t get voters to clap for him. When asked what kind of drink Jeb would be, one supporter said milk — “a normal drink.” “He’s a little meek,” another supporter said. Not Bee. If there’s one complaint: Once a week is just not enough for Samantha Bee. Do something about that, will you, TBS?

  • Gail Pennington

    The world is ending. How funny is that? Pretty darn funny, at least as depicted in You, Me and the Apocalypse, a British import making its U.S. debut Thursday on NBC. But this isn't a flat-out comedy. In classic British style, it's also weird and dark, with an uncomfortable premise and characters who are quirky at best, horrible at worst.

  • Hank Stuever

    In the past two years, the WGN America cable channel, which was forever known to basic cable subscribers for baseball games and sitcom reruns, redefined its business plan and ordered up some of them fancy-style original drama series to add to its schedule. Outsiders is a notable leap forward for the network, as taut and intriguing and artfully conceived as any of the pretty-good series I’ve reviewed in the past year. You could proudly serve it alongside Sons of Anarchy, Rectify or Justified, and your guests might not taste the difference. With this show, WGN America is asserting its right to make provocative television. The fight for viewers’ attention is getting bloodier.

  • Ed Bark

    FX’s male-centric misery index remains very much alive and suffering, even without Rescue Me. The network and its offshoot, FXX, still provide homes for Louie, You’re the Worst, Man Seeking Woman and Sex&Drugs&Rock&Roll. But all are pre-serpent Gardens of Eden compared to FX’s Baskets, in which Zach Galifianakis (it’s bad enough having to repeatedly type his name) plays perhaps the saddest sack in TV series history. Baskets shows no signs of melting into anything close to gooey sentimentality. Its trials and tribulations pole vault over those on HBO’s Girls, but without getting all whiny and preachy about it. Zach Galifianakis, Louie Anderson and Martha Kelly fit their roles like the thick rubber gloves used in emptying human waste from portable johns. What fine messes they’re in.

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