Bellum Entertainment To Distribute 'America Now'

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TVNewsCheck,

America Now, the syndicated daily newsmagazine show co-hosted by Leeza Gibbons and Bill Rancic from ITV Studios America and Raycom Media, today announced a new distribution team.

Mary Carole McDonnell’s Bellum Entertainment has taken over the distribution for the series. Boots Walker has joined Bellum as vice president of sales. She and Boyd McDonnell, vice president of programming, will lead the team of five sales representatives to expand its outreach. Starting this month, the show has a new primetime clearance on Adell Broadcasting’s independent WADL Detroit (DMA 11).

“We have been so gratified by the positive response to America Now, and we feel extremely fortunate to begin 2012 with such great news to announce,” said Paul McTear, president-CEO of Raycom Media. “We’re excited about what adding Detroit … and confident that adding Bellum to our team will succeed in bringing the show to even more viewers.”

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America Now airs weekdays in 45 markets.

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Wil Roddy posted over 3 years ago
Good luck with the show, it has potential..
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Ratings

Overnights, adults 18-49 for July 29, 2015
  • 1.
    1.6/6
  • 2.
    1.2/5
  • 3.
    1.1/4
  • 4.
    0.8/3
  • 5.
    0.7/3
  • 6.
    0.2/1
Source: Nielsen

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