Dma 59

Lockwood Names Neal Davis GM Of WBXX

In announces the management appointment after closing on its purchase of the Knoxville, Tenn., CW affiliate from Acme.
By
TVNewsCheck,

Lockwood Broadcast Group has appointed Neal Davis the new general manager of CW affiliate WBXX Knoxville, Tenn. (DMA 59).  The announcement coincides with Lockwood’s acquisition of WBXX from Acme Communications.

Davis brings more than 20 years of experience as a broadcast TV executive, most recently as GM of WLFL-WRDC Raleigh, N.C. Prior to that, he held the same position at WMBD-WYZZ Peoria-Bloomington, Ill., market after advancing from local and general sales management positions at WYZZ.

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“We are excited to have a broadcaster of Neal’s experience and character leading our team in Knoxville, and have real confidence he can take this strong station to even greater success,” said Gerald Walsh, Lockwood VP of broadcast operations.

In February Lockwood Broadcast Group announced an agreement with Acme Communications to acquire WBXX for $5.6 million cash. The group’s other stations include WQCW Charleston-Huntington, W.Va. (CW); WHDF Huntsville-Decatur Ala. (CW); and KTEN Sherman, Texas-Ada, Okla., which carries programming from NBC, ABC and CW.

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Comments (2) -

ShameOnUS Nickname posted over 5 years ago
Neil is one of the best GMs around. He has the passion for the business and his people. Lucky BXX!
BobJones Nickname posted over 5 years ago
From Sinclair to Lockwood. Lucky guy?
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Ratings

Overnights, adults 18-49 for February 4, 2016
  • 1.
    2.2/7
  • 2.
    1.9/6
  • 3.
    1.2/4
  • 4.
    1.1/4
  • 5.
    0.7/2
  • 6.
    0.7/2
Source: Nielsen

Reviews

  • Gail Pennington

    The world is ending. How funny is that? Pretty darn funny, at least as depicted in You, Me and the Apocalypse, a British import making its U.S. debut Thursday on NBC. But this isn't a flat-out comedy. In classic British style, it's also weird and dark, with an uncomfortable premise and characters who are quirky at best, horrible at worst.

  • Hank Stuever

    In the past two years, the WGN America cable channel, which was forever known to basic cable subscribers for baseball games and sitcom reruns, redefined its business plan and ordered up some of them fancy-style original drama series to add to its schedule. Outsiders is a notable leap forward for the network, as taut and intriguing and artfully conceived as any of the pretty-good series I’ve reviewed in the past year. You could proudly serve it alongside Sons of Anarchy, Rectify or Justified, and your guests might not taste the difference. With this show, WGN America is asserting its right to make provocative television. The fight for viewers’ attention is getting bloodier.

  • Ed Bark

    FX’s male-centric misery index remains very much alive and suffering, even without Rescue Me. The network and its offshoot, FXX, still provide homes for Louie, You’re the Worst, Man Seeking Woman and Sex&Drugs&Rock&Roll. But all are pre-serpent Gardens of Eden compared to FX’s Baskets, in which Zach Galifianakis (it’s bad enough having to repeatedly type his name) plays perhaps the saddest sack in TV series history. Baskets shows no signs of melting into anything close to gooey sentimentality. Its trials and tribulations pole vault over those on HBO’s Girls, but without getting all whiny and preachy about it. Zach Galifianakis, Louie Anderson and Martha Kelly fit their roles like the thick rubber gloves used in emptying human waste from portable johns. What fine messes they’re in.

  • Tom Conroy

    Angel from Hell is a goofy new sitcom from CBS starring Jane Lynch. It’s reminiscent of the wacky premises of the supernatural sitcoms of the ’60s, and it clashes with the PG-13 humor required in the ’10s. But the decent jokes, fast pace and hard-working cast — with Lynch doing most of the heavy lifting — make the half hour pass quickly. Although it’s unlikely that the comedy’s situation has what it takes to power a full season, the show is probably worth watching at least once, if only as an oddity.

  • Maureen Ryan

    Given the critical and creative success of Mr. Robot, one would be forgiven for hoping USA’s next high-profile offering, the sci-fi drama Colony, would be similarly bracing and mold-breaking. Colony does have a few things going for it, most notably Lost veteran Josh Holloway as the patriarch of a family in post-invasion Los Angeles. But in general, this series is frustratingly patchy and generic — unwilling to grapple in any consistent way with the moral and political implications of its premise — and key elements of the story remain disappointingly underdeveloped.

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